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Hi all,

I'm on a mission to crack out a 1.065 OG IPA in three weeks (yes I know it's a bad idea) and have been reading up on accelerated ageing / brewing processes, thought I'd share what I've come up with - any feedback / input greatly appreciated.

Basic Stats:

  • OG: 1.065
  • FG: 1.014
  • IBU: 66
  • Hops: Citra, Zythos
  • Volume: 45L
  • Yeast: M44

Proposed Process: (assuming gravity drops as planned)

  1. Whip as much oxygen as I can into it
  2. Re-pitch full trub from 27L of XPA made with M44
  3. First 5 days at 18 deg (probably a degree or two lower than I'd usually brew this at but want to keep as clean as possible - XPA was brewed at 16 degrees so hopefully yeast won't be too sluggish)
  4. Ramp up to 23 degrees over 3 days (to push clean up)
  5. Dry hop for 3 days at 23 degrees (from what I've read most volatiles should be in solution after 2 days plus at 23 degrees should be relatively quick)
  6. Cold crash and rack to CO2 purged keg and rapid carbonate
  7. Bring up to 25 degrees for 9 days (to accelerate ageing process)
  8. Cold crash and hit with gelatin for 1.5 days

Thoughts?

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Replies to This Discussion

Personally I would be drinking it as soon as it was carbonated. Except for complex high gravity beers ( Barley Wines, Scotch Ales etc) I am yet to be convinced there is any value in ageing the majority of beer styles....in fact, for hop driven beers like this one, fresh is best for any well brewed Pale Ale and IPA when hop flavour and aroma are at their peak. So yes, I think 3 weeks gives you plenty of time and I would skip that ' ageing' stage and probably use gelatine in the fermenter, before transfer to your keg.
It's going to be tight for time. I find M44 is a bit on the slow side (which is what gives it its clean flavour). S05 is slightly faster, but your use of a large starter and lots of oxygen might compensate for that. If you wanted to hurry things along you could use Nottingham yeast which is quite a bit faster, but it will give more of a estery/floral character which probably wouldn't suit the American IPA style

Aging schmaging for pale ales.  Aging is sometimes used to clean up a poorly brewed beer or to mellow out a darker beer.

Three weeks is enough time but I wouldn't compromise the beer by over-pitching and over-oxygenating.  Just pitch the correct amount of yeast and oxygenate to appropriate levels. 

Thanks for the feedback all,

I think my main concern was reducing tannins - took about four weeks from bottling to smooth out last time although from what I've read gelatin can help strip tannins so should hopefully help bring it together faster. Also I acidified my sparge water and made sure not to go too high on mash-out to try and reduce tannin extraction in the first place.

I also stretched out the time in primary vs the suggested post fermentation ageing with the aim of allowing more time for clean-up and added gelatin to the primary as suggested.

What I've ended up going for below - proof will be in the drinking this Sat night...

  1. Whip as much oxygen as I can into it
  2. Re-pitch half trub from 27L of XPA made with M44
  3. First 5 days at 18 deg (probably a degree or two lower than I'd usually brew this at but want to keep as clean as possible - yeast took off and was slowing down after 5 days)
  4. Ramp up to 23 degrees over 2 days (to push clean up)
  5. Held at 23 degrees for 3 days
  6. Dry hop for 4 days at 23 degrees (from what I've read most volatiles should be in solution after 2 days plus at 23 degrees should be relatively quick)
  7. Cold crash for 2 days (measured gravity prior to crash - hit FG)
  8. Hit with gelatin for 3 days 
  9. Rack to CO2 purged corny & fast carbonate (24 hrs @ 30psi) cold condition for further 2 days
  10. Drink

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